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Answers From Q & A
#11
It was good of them to respond. Thank you. There is a difference, at times, between a response and an answer. I am reminded of the balloonist who got lost. He spotted a farm, and dropped altitude so that he could call out to the farmer. "Where am I?" "You're in a balloon." A quick, concise, accurate response. But not extremely helpful nor enlightening.

When my kids were teenagers, if I wanted to find out information that they were reluctant to disclose, I had to be quite creative and precise in my questioning. It's puzzling when salesmen are reluctant to share information, but maybe it's just a technique.

If they have figured out how to get 3-window coverage from a sunvisor, you'd think they'd be excited to share that. It's no big deal on vehicles with two front seats and two visors, but is a bit more of a design challenge on a single-seater.

Regen - a missed opportunity do discuss the design and benefits of the system they chose or are in the process of choosing. Are they going for single-pedal operation, a hand trigger, or is it incorporated into the early part of the brake pedal travel?

etc. Maybe they just don't want to discuss what percentage of the MSRP is represented by the battery pack, though it was a good point to make that the battery carries a free replacement warranty for 5 years.

The recharge rate answer was unimpressive. How many amps are required for the 220v circuit? How many amps are drawn? Is it really silly for someone not to want to go to the expense of installing a separate 220v circuit if they have a 110v circuit available, and overnight charging is not a problem? The same amperage questions apply for 110v. Is it silly to think that a buyer might wind up needing to recharge when only 110v is available?

Again, maybe it's just a selling technique to keep the prospect in suspense until the company/salesman is ready to close the sale. "It's new. It's cool. It's green. Save the world. Buy it now. Don't sweat the details."

Maybe it's just Canadian style. Low-key vs enthusiasm. IDK

At some point the vehicles should be on the road, and hopefully the early purchasers will supply the information and enthusiasm.
I'm done.
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#12
An off the shelf moveable pilot's sun visor may be the simple answer to three window coverage in the solo's cockpit.  Unlike fixed visors they can be moved anywhere.

The windshield wiper is more of an engineering challenge.
White Hot Solo #166
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#13
(10-10-2016, 01:35 PM)Rickb Wrote: An off the shelf moveable pilot's sun visor may be the simple answer to three window coverage in the solo's cockpit.  Unlike fixed visors they can be moved anywhere.

The windshield wiper is more of an engineering challenge.

Those visors are cool.  Thanks.  I'd think they'd work better in an airplane with fixed windows and a relatively straight flight path than in a trike with roll-down windows on curvy roads and city streets, but I like the idea.  I just don't see it as a practical solution for the Solo.

The wiper challenge is interesting.  I'd go with a vertically-parked wiper with the pivot centered.  Perhaps a dual-arm design like on some boats. The downsides would be the aerodynamic effect if you parked the wiper on a pillar, or the visibility effect if you park it in the center of the windshield, or the possible marketing effect of public perception.

Whatever they do, it could be a marketing point of saying "Look how clever we are in solving this challenge.".
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#14
It is a series of engineering and design challenges to bring any new vehicle concept to market. The Solo looks very basic and functional much like the original VW Beetle concept. I thank Mike Corbin for the original engineering and design of his Sparrow. Also, JK's vision to transform it into the Solo. I think ElectraM is clever if they actually get the Solo to market to what ever the finalized specifications. I know full well they will be saying, we should have done this or that, but it leaves room for change and or improvements to future models........like the Solo Twinn. The current specs may be the result of efforts to stay within the somewhat more affordable MSRP goal.

The Solo currently checks many of the boxes that meet my three wheeler commuter requirements. It may be my first motorcycle purchase since my first car purchase, a slightly used 1959 VW.
White Hot Solo #166
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#15
(10-10-2016, 12:32 PM)paravil Wrote: "147kmh (91+mph) ...and still pulling hard" was on the track, whereas production vehicles are said to have a limited top speed. I´d like to know whether it would be possible to de-dregulate it?
The last figures I saw on the regulated top speed were between 80mph and 85mph.

That was before today's email arrived.
According to Jerry today, the real world regulated top end is TBA.
To me that says that they're still toying with all things computer on the vehicle.

To deregulate it?
It's here-say but I've heard that almost anything's possible with the right software.
The question of, "Did I void my warranty?" will probably eventually pop up though.
Required listening... House of Lords - Can't find my way home
This version kicks. There's just no other way to describe it. Shivers. Turn...it...up!
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#16
warranty should not be a problem, some folks have played around with I3, i did not hear any troubles
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