Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
What About the Gas?
#11
Just a general question that does not specifically concern the EM Solo that has been bothering me: I sometimes run out of fuel on my motorbike (especially when I forget to switch back from `reserve´ after re-filling with fuel). I then have to use my mobile `phone to call a taxi to take me to the nearest filling station, where I buy a cheap plastic cannister with fuel and take me back to my bike. Expensive, but that´s life.

But what does an EV driver do when the batteries are flat? Can he hire a portable auxiliary battery? And how does he connect it to the car? Is there plug inside the vehicle? Or does he have to have the thing towed to the nearest charging point?
Reply
#12
(10-13-2016, 05:58 AM)paravil Wrote: Just a general question that does not specifically concern the EM Solo that has been bothering me: I sometimes run out of fuel on my motorbike (especially when I forget to switch back from `reserve´ after re-filling with fuel). I then have to use my mobile `phone to call a taxi to take me to the nearest filling station, where I buy a cheap plastic cannister with fuel and take me back to my bike. Expensive, but that´s life.

But what does an EV driver do when the batteries are flat? Can he hire a portable auxiliary battery? And how does he connect it to the car? Is there plug inside the vehicle? Or does he have to have the thing towed to the nearest charging point?

Good question Smile have been thinking the same way. Would be nice to have a possibilty to connect a back-up battery inside or in front compartment.  
And another idea that's been on my mind; what about putting a flexible solar panel on the roof. If it was thin, glue it on, cover with resin/epoxy and polish.
Reply
#13
Yup , big concern for me. In my area, power outages are fairly frequent and can be quite long. It would be nice to have some way to get some juice into the car, even if it was a very slow trickle charge. We were out for 3 weeks in July of 1012, then another week with superstorm sandy the same year, this year alone there has been a cumulative time of over a week, and thats with no storms, just random outages. Would not be any fun to put the car on charge when I get home from work, only to have the power out that night and then cannot get to work in the morning.
Reply
#14
If the EV was my only car I would have concern too. However, as an and EV commuter vehicle it's not an issue. The ICE primary vehicle is fueled and ready to go. Hopefully, I can avoid the fueling problems of the people in lines at the pumps during the Mathew evacuation. I'm thinking if I had a full charge in my Solo, I could have escaped town immediately while others were waiting to fill their gas tanks. I may have chosen to drive the ICE out of town while towing the Solo to safety.
White Hot Solo #166
Reply
#15
I've had my share of "Life is hard. It's harder when you're stupid." moments. I've rolled into gas stations w/o fuel, pushed vehicles in, and walked in.
It seems to come down to:
Plan ahead.
Have a contingency plan.
Rely on the kindness of friends.
Rely on the kindness of strangers.
Suffer.

Some ideas: Plug in as soon as you get home. Carry the charging cable in the vehicle. Carry a map of available outlets. Acquire towing coverage.

Just as it's not a bad idea to check traffic and weather when you get up, rather than waiting until you walk out the door, it's probably a good thing to check the charge status when you get up, if it wasn't already full (enough) before you went to bed.

While the details of the routines will be different with an EV, the concepts are the same ones we've lived by for our whole lives. At times, things just don't work out as planned, but we still plan.
I'm done.
Reply
#16
My experience with range planning was with my first car a '59 VW Bug and it's 1 gallon capacity reserve fuel tank lever and the last 30 miles to the nearest gas station.

Easy planning to start the day with a full overnight charge in an EV. Heck, with wireless chargers, some EV owners don't even have to remember to plug it in.
White Hot Solo #166
Reply
#17
(10-03-2016, 12:30 PM)Rickb Wrote: The development of EV's and other alternative vehicles isn't to replace all ICE vehicles, but rather to help reduce our dependency on foreign oil and perhaps stretch the USA oil reserves to provide an adequate affordable supply of gas for those that choose or require gas for their ICE vehicles in the future and perhaps inadvertently help improve the environment along the way.  

I gotta respectfully disagree with that statement.

I believe the development of EV's and other alternative vehicles is: to sell a different (not necessarily better) mousetrap to get the job done. That is, to transport folks from A to B.

Any other reason would dictate that the mousetrap be provided at no profit.
Reply
#18
2015 SR400 owners-post your vin last 4, production month. production mo/year on white label on upper front frame and state/country where registered. It has been reported 500 units are coming to the U.S. for the 2015 model year.
Reply
#19
(09-10-2017, 03:23 PM)PeterNut Wrote: 2015 SR400 owners-post your vin last 4, production month. production mo/year on white label on upper front frame and state/country where registered. It has been reported 500 units are coming to the U.S. for the 2015 model year.
http://www.cycleworld.com/2014/08/26/201...ons#page-2
Required listening... House of Lords - Can't find my way home
This version kicks. There's just no other way to describe it. Shivers. Turn...it...up!
Disclaimer: No false statistics were supported, displayed or harmed in the making of this post.
Reply
#20
(06-05-2017, 11:48 AM)Qubit Wrote:
(10-03-2016, 12:30 PM)Rickb Wrote: The development of EV's and other alternative vehicles isn't to replace all ICE vehicles, but rather to help reduce our dependency on foreign oil and perhaps stretch the USA oil reserves to provide an adequate affordable supply of gas for those that choose or require gas for their ICE vehicles in the future and perhaps inadvertently help improve the environment along the way.  

I gotta respectfully disagree with that statement.

I believe the development of EV's and other alternative vehicles is: to sell a different (not necessarily better) mousetrap to get the job done. That is, to transport folks from A to B.

Any other reason would dictate that the mousetrap be provided at no profit.

I know this is an old strand and you guys may have since seen the light... but you are both wrong. You are looking through the fog at an elephant but your field of view is so narrow that one is seeing a trunk and the other a tail. Still, the creature you describe so differently is an elephant.

The big picture is that an EV is far superior to an ICEd vehicle for a large number of use-cases. An EV is much more efficient in terms of energy/mile or cost/mile if you combine capital cost, energy and maintenance. The maker who charges so little for an ICEd vehicle does so knowing he can charge monopolistic prices on parts and service. The maker who charges so much for an EV knows the EV may not come back except for tires, bearings and brakes for a decade.

It's a bit dark but millions of Floridians had to wait to fill their ICEd tanks before evacuating for a hurricane. Imagine how much simpler it would be to evacuate a city if EVs were used. Range doesn't matter if the tank is empty or the car is in the shop waiting for service. There are far more electrical outlets in the world than filling stations and they are available 24x7.

So, the world will see EVs replace a lot of ICEd vehicles because they are a better mousetrap AND the world is developing a variety of EVs because consumers and governments are demanding that be done. I, for one, will likely never buy another ICEd vehicle, both to save the planet and because I can't afford an ICEd vehicle even if it were given away for $0. I recently helped an ICEd owner do some DIY service to avoid paying nearly $1000 for professional service. His cost was ~$200 for parts and tools and about 6h of our lives shopping and working. This was just to change the oil and sparkplugs... Yes, the engine had to be partly disassembled to reach the plugs... Yes, the car had to be jacked up to drain the oil and a special socket had to be bought just to change the oil filter... ICEd vehicles cost way too much for the benefit of getting from A to B. The friend fears a wheel-bearing is going... My own ICEd vehicles has a long list of postponed repairs. I'd rather use the money to buy an EV. The friend is still not convinced but getting closer.

Interest rates are low. People can afford to buy an EV by borrowing and paying a little interest instead of supporting an ICE. Heck, my wife could afford an EV instead of paying traffic tickets...
My blog is an eclectic list of rants and commentary about things for which I care. See MrPogson.com It's been around a decade...
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 2 Guest(s)