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#21
thanks

i thought the certification process is public info, sorry i did not know that,
any idea how long would this take
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#22
(11-13-2016, 11:06 PM)ram Wrote: thanks

i thought the certification process is public info, sorry i did not know  that,
any idea how long would this take

I could be wrong, but I'm fairly certain that the information is only made public at the end of the certification tests.  My speculation is reasonably informed, but nothing like absolute knowledge.  My suspicion is that the time frame would be between 2 and 6 months.

Emissions - rubber stamp.
Lighting - pretty easy.
Brakes - depends.  Probably one of the more serious tests.
Glass - not sure how much would apply to "motorcycles", but if everything is automotive-spec, it s/b easy.
Tires - easy - just put DOT-spec tires on it. 
High-voltage electrical - I don't know what kind of testing is currently being done, but this might be the most in-depth testing.  I would expect that the HV electrical tests may not be completely delineated at this time.
I'm done.
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#23
I am informed that trikes (and quads) are not road tested in the EU to the same standards as "M" class vehicles (cars), as the owners of these vehicles are expected to accept the risks that are inherent in their design. Riders (drivers) do not have to wear heömets, and air bags/seat belts are not mandatory.

This is why independent and professional road testing is so important to me.
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#24
US Motorcycle classed vehicles (2 or 3 wheels) don't have to be crash tested and/or meet the same safety standards as cars either. I ass.u.me the Solo and SRK enclosed or partially enclosed trike platforms are likely to be the safest motorbikes you have ever ridden?
White Hot Solo #166
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#25
Like paravil, I am quite interested in independent and professional testing. Like rickb, I expect that the Solo (or SRK) would have better crash protection and crash survivability than my motorcycles, past and present. Until I see testing results, especially braking, cornering, and handling, I cannot yet assume that the Solo (or SRK) would be "safer".

Personally, I'm not so much concerned with my ability to survive a crash as I am concerned with my ability to avoid the crash in the first place.
I'm done.
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#26
Wilwood Is recognized as a world class Brake Component Manufacturer, so the Solo's specified component parts have a level of credibility.

Stopping distance, cornering, handling, stability, and safety TBD.  Those vehicle qualities were apparently satisfactory with the Sparrow and the Solo looks to have styling and engineering changes that very well will enhance performance, handling, and safety.  Those testing results should be made available sooner than later.  
Somebody stated that Canadian compliance requires crash testing.  That will be interesting.

The other performance, handling, and safety factor I consider to have some credibility is the result of team Solo having a direct connection to the wonderful world of performance race cars.  These guys should know performance and handling characteristics and likely incorporated those characteristics into the Solo throughout the early stages of development.
White Hot Solo #166
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#27
"Personally, I'm not so much concerned with my ability to survive a crash as I am concerned with my ability to avoid the crash in the first place." quote from flying_solo

Amen brother, Amen!

"Airbags..., airbags....We don't need no steenking airbags!"
2015 Nissan Leaf owner/lover
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#28
Of course the worst case scenario on a motorbike could happen to me tomorrow (or today!). But at eighty years of age, and having been on a bike since the age of twelve (or thereabouts), I can now judge that I have had my worst mishaps in cars, and have (as yet) always managed to avoid danger better on a bike. Even the unavoidable is very often alleviated by the ability to come off a bike, instead of being squashed inside a tin box.

Before I take ownership of a three-wheeler, I DEFINITELY want to know all about its stability in a turn, its roadhiolding ability etc. etc. !!!!

(... and again, Rick, I´d advise not to be so trusting in ."...team Solo having a direct connection to the wonderful world of performance race cars", as this is totally new territory)
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#29
(11-15-2016, 05:45 AM)paravil Wrote: Of course the worst case scenario on a motorbike could happen to me tomorrow (or today!). But at eighty years of age, and having been on a bike since the age of twelve (or thereabouts), I can now judge that I have had my worst mishaps in cars, and have (as yet) always managed to avoid danger better on a bike. Even the unavoidable is very often alleviated by the ability to come off a bike, instead of being squashed inside a tin box.

Before I take ownership of a three-wheeler, I DEFINITELY want to know all about its stability in a turn, its roadhiolding ability etc. etc. !!!!

(... and again, Rick, I´d advise not to be so trusting in ."...team Solo having a direct connection to the wonderful world of performance race cars", as this is totally new territory)
I trust only that the High Performance Race Car Industry connected Solo designers and engineers likely considered performance, handling, and safety factors during the development process.........not trusting they succeeded until test results and a test drive verify it. 

I don't agree that this is totally new territory since the Solo is based on Mike Corbin's 'proven' Sparrow platform.  Corbin gets credit for his design, engineering, testing, compliance, and manufacturing 300 Sparrows before the economic downturn that fueled his bankruptcy........beyond the fact that Corbin was too early in the EV market for much market acceptance back in '02.  EV market acceptance let alone a three wheeler commuter EV market acceptance is still an issue.  

Technically, there were 300 proven road tested Sparrows that I consider to be the Solo's Pilot Fleet. I don't recall any news related Sparrow crash and burn stories.  However, Corbin's business did crash and burn.  Regardless, it was fun to watch the Corbin Motor's Sparrow evolve into the ElectraMeccanica Solo.  Now if I can only get in and out of the damn thing, I may be good to ride.
White Hot Solo #166
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#30
Gentlemen, there are a few reports of sparrows ending up facing the wrong direction on roads due to a minimal amount of moisture and/or gravel.
This seemed to be occurrences that also happened on uneven road surfaces. These reports from owners were made over 17 years and are on the internet.
There were even a few reports of "near tips" due to the vehicle's tendency to execute  these occasional 180s at speed under the described conditions.

http://www.tom-morrow-land.com/sparrow/

The largest place for conversation with, and information from, Sparrow owners is https://beta.groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/sparrow_ev/info
You'll need a Yahoo account to see and/or search the group.  After looking for a couple of days, I requested to become a group member and was denied.

That being said... As paravil points out, the Sparrow and the Solo are not the same vehicle. The Solo has a wider front stance and a much lower center of gravity.
That's just where the differences start. I have the belief that EMV was well aware of the Sparrow's strengths and weaknesses and engineered the Solo accordingly.

 That's just MHO.
Required listening... House of Lords - Can't find my way home
This version kicks. There's just no other way to describe it. Shivers. Turn...it...up!
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